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Mental Health In Lockdown

Mental Health & Wellbeing During The Pandemic

The term mental health is spoken about and acknowledged more so now, than what feels like forever to me.  The danger aDuringnd strange paradox in our instant information overload saturated society, with words, labels and phrases becoming more, apparent, they can lose meaning, a little. A kind of desensitisation, because it’s always there.

So what is it, this mental health of ours…?

Mental health is our unique emotional, psychological, and social well-being. How we feel, how we think and how we are in a relationship with the world.  In 2020 all of our worlds have now changed…… exponentially.

Day one of second lockdown, ( I am writing this in the evening and feeling reflective). Looking after our thoughts in this pandemic, is a whole other nuanced concept. The first lockdown manifested the light shining on the cracks that for some of us who previously had not had any particular reason or life event to go into much consideration to, wheres my head at questions? state of mind,  mental health, far too busy, doing, keeping our worlds going, dealing with what that throws at us. without even having the time to be even asking the question, of how am I?.

With an almost unconscious attitude of, well that’s for those people.  In being highly functioning by that I mean holding down  desired job with a regular income being in an intimate relationship have a family, home), functioning on a societal expectationand having some status. many were removed from

For me I notice,  register the  familiar, entirely manageable feeling of fear washing over slightly differently than the first lockdown and I’m almost instantly more vigilant in response.  A sense of sadness pervades me inside and out, as I think of the  suffering and pain involved with living with Covid the damage it wreaks. Tinges of shame are felt, as a deep awareness or suspicion that we are responsible for what is happening to us as a species, feels congruent.

The rational thinking side and how to approach tells me:

It will help to try and see it as a different period in your life, and not necessarily a bad one, even if you didn’t choose it. It’s normal that the uncertainty and changes to our day-to-day lives might affect our mood and hope we can all be banging pots and pans again, feeling a sense of unity, validation and acknowledgement of living through an unprecedented unexpected lived experience. Just because no one else can do your inner work for you, it doesn’t mean you can should or need to do it alone.

It will help to try and see it as a different period in your life, and not necessarily a bad one, even if you didn’t choose it. It’s normal that the uncertainty and changes to our day-to-day lives might affect our mood.levels of anxiety, isolation and fatigue are not only at their highest since the emergence of the virus, they are still rising.

The evidence manifests the guilt of the defendant .

Paul Farmer, chief executive of mental health charity Mind, says it could be “the greatest test of our mental health this year”, not just for the public but for healthcare staff who are “working tirelessly, but may be struggling with their mental health too”.

Both Mind and Carers UK say the Government has to learn from mistakes in the first wave and make sure people can get help early on.In many way,s Covid-19 has thrown into sharp focus numerous issues surrounding the protection of people facing domestic abuse that long predate the pandemic. During a decade of austerity the sector has suffered drastic funding cuts, including £7m slashed by councils for women’s refuges in England, Wales and Scotland between 2010 and 2018. The 2020 Domestic Abuse Report from Women’s Aid estimated that more than 23,000 referrals to refuges were declined in 2018-19.

 

 

 

 

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